All cases in Psoriasis and Related Disorders

Melasma-like LPA

Melasma-like LPA

History

          Lichen planus actinicus (LPA), or pigmentosus, or subtropicus occurs mainly in Middle Eastern countries, where between 20% and 30% of lichen planus cases are of this type. It tends to be more common in young adults of both sexes. The lesions develop in spring and summer on sun-exposed areas, especially the face. Three different forms have been described: annular (the most common type), pigmented (melasma-like), and dyschromic. The lesions are typically annular plaques with central slate blue to light brown pigmentation and well-defined, slightly raised, hypopigmented borders. Pruritus is minimal or absent and usually there is no oral mucous membrane involvement. The presented woman has melasma-like LPA involving mainly the butterfly area of the face of many months duration.
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Infantile psoriasis

Infantile psoriasis

Infantile psoriasis2

History

           A very interesting and strange case of red scaly oval plaques with central hypopigmentation involving the trunk specially the abdomen in a 2-month old infant of three weeks duration. Few other lesions were clasical psoriatic plaques on the forearms and thighs. On mometasone ointment once daily the rash has almost cleared within 2-3 weeks (see the second photo).
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Acrodermatitis continua suppurativa

Acrodermatitis continua suppurativa

Acrodermatitis continua suppurativa2

History

          The relation of acrodermatitis continua suppurative (Hallopeau) to psoriasis is controversial. However, some consider it as a localized form of psoriasis characterized by pustules limited to one or a few fingertips including the nail bed. Nail loss is not uncommon. Herein we present a typical case of acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau characterized by chronic inflammation and pustulation confined to one finger (thumb) with nail loss of more than three years duration.
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Palmar psoriasis

Palmar psoriasis

History

         A 23-year-old man suffered a more than 3-year-history of palmar psoriasis with exacerbations and partial remissions on potent topical corticosteroids. The well-demarcated,red, scaly plaques involved mainly the thenar and hypothenar eminences of both hands in a symmetrical manner.
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Linear lichen planus

Linear lichen planus

History

        Many dermatoses may take linear configuration as a such or as a part of Kobner’s isomorphic phenomenon. Of these dermatoses; psoriasis, lichen planus, plant allergic contact dermatitis, linear epidermal nevi and vitiligo are prototypes. The current case is a 35-year-old man has had linear lichen planus with classical purplish papules extending along the radial side of the index finger of about one year duration.
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